Cromwell’s Victory over King Charles II & his Presbyterian Scots at Worcester, 1651

Eric Jon Phelps
By Eric Jon Phelps November 9, 2010 17:11 Updated

Cromwell’s Victory over King Charles II & his Presbyterian Scots at Worcester, 1651

Cromwell Dismissing the Long “Rump” Parliament, 1653

The Presbyterian Scots, in league with traitorous King Charles Stuart II, fought their last battle against Cromwell’s Parliamentary New Model Army in the English town of Worcester, 1651.  The day of battle: September 3, exactly one year to the day on which Cromwell defeated the Scots at Dunbar in Scotland.  The king, nicknamed “The Grand Malignant,” was using his deceased father’s enemies having begun the First Civil War in 1642, the Protestant Presbyterian Scottish army.  But after a four-hour fight, Charles and his Scottish army was routed, thousands of Scots losing their lives while Cromwell lost no more than 200 men.  For this signal victory from the hand of the God and Father of the Risen Lord Jesus Christ, Cromwell gives the Lord complete credit and all praise!  We read a portion of his letter to William Lenthall, Esquire, Speaker of the Parliament of England, it having been composed and sent the day following Cromwell’s victory:

“The dimensions of this mercy are above my thoughts.  It is, for aught I know, a crowning mercy.  Surely, if it be not, such a one we shall have, if this provoke those that are concerned in it to thankfulness; and the Parliament to do the will of Him who hath done His will for it, and for the Nation;— whose good pleasure it is to establish the Nation and the Change of Government, by making the People so wiling to the defence thereof, and so signally blessing the endavours of our servants in this late great work.  I am bold humbly to beg, That all thoughts may tend to the promoting of His honour who hath wrought so great salvation; and that the fatness of these continued mercies may not occasion pride and wantonness, as formerly the like hath done to a chosen Nation [Israel]; but that the fear of the Lord, even for His mercies, may keep an Authority and a People so prospered, and blessed, and witnessed unto, humble and faithful; and that justice and righteousness, mercy and truth may flow from you, as a thankful return to our gracious God.  This shall be the prayer of, Sir, your most humble and obedient servant,

OLIVER CROMWELL.”

Thomas Carlyle, Oliver Cromwell’s Letters and Speeches: With Elucidations, (London: Chapman & Hall, Ltd., 1889), Vol. III of V, pp. 158-159.

Eric Jon Phelps
By Eric Jon Phelps November 9, 2010 17:11 Updated
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