Cromwell’s Blessed 10-Year Rule of Roman Catholic Ireland Maligned by the Jesuits

Eric Jon Phelps
By Eric Jon Phelps October 19, 2010 17:17 Updated

Cromwell’s Blessed 10-Year Rule of Roman Catholic Ireland Maligned by the Jesuits

Cromwell Gazing on the Body of Executed King Charles I, 1648

Upon Cromwell’s submission of fanatical Roman Catholic Ireland led by Jesuit Priests having incited the nation to murder over 300,000 Scots-Irish and English Protestants for eight years (1641-1649), Ireland began to enjoy domestic peace.  For ten years, from 1650 to 1660 in which year the diabolical King Charles II was restored to the throne of England, Ireland enjoyed a prosperity and peace unknown for centuries.  For it was in 1172 AD that Englishman Nicholas Breakspear, under the name of “Pope Adrian IV,” gave Ireland to English King Henry II with the order to shove the Roman Catholic religion down the throats of the once Bible-believing Irish people when Ireland was known as “Hibernia.”  Thus God, in His wonderful providence, used the same English government, now under the sway of Puritan Calvinists, to give the Irish people the opportunity to return to the faith of the Baptist preacher known today as “St. Patrick” (as he was no Roman Catholic!) and thereby embrace the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ as a matter or civil polity.

But the Jesuits, in refusing to give ground to an irrefutable historical record, invented the myth known to all brainwashed Irishmen as “the Curse of Cromwell.” This lie perpetually feeds an Irish hatred for all Englishmen while creating a false moral supremacy upon which the Irish base their “just claim” for “Home Rule.”  And as all Protestant historians know “Home Rule is Rome Rule,” the Irish people must be kept in a ceaseless state of agitation in the Jesuit Order’s war upon White Protestant and Baptist Independent English people so accursed by the Black Pope’s Counter Reformation Council of Trent.  But historian Thomas Carlyle sets the record straight as to the “Curse of Cromwell,” that it was indeed a blessing of prosperity and peace unsurpassed in review of the dismal history of a people having been kept in a degraded squalor and intellectual retardation since Henry II imposed the iron boot of Rome over “the Emerald Isle.” May all of us AV1611 Reformation Bible-believers take the following words of Carlyle to heart while we preach the gospel to Rome’s greatest defenders now under the Vatican’s tyranny of the unwanted Lisbon Treaty—the dear but duped Irish Roman Catholics!

“There goes a wild story, which owes it first place in History to Clarendon, I think, who is the author of many such:  How the Parliament at one time had decided to ‘exterminate’ all the Irish population; and then, finding this would not quite answer, had contented itself with packing them all off into the Province of Connaught, there to live upon the moorlands; and so had pacified the Sister Island.  Strange rumours no doubt were afloat in the Council of Kilkenney, in the Conventicle or Clonmacnoise, and other such quarters, and were kept up for very obvious purposes in those days; and my Lord of Clarendon at an after date, seeing Puritanism hung on the gallows and tumbled in heaps in St. Margaret’s, thought it safe to write with considerable latitude respecting its procedure.  My Lord had, in fact, the story all his own way for about a hundred-and-fifty years; and, during that time, has set afloat through vague heads a great many things.  His authority is rapidly sinking; and will now probably sink deeper than even it deserves.

“The real procedure of the Puritan Commonwealth towards Ireland is not a matter of conjecture, or of report by Lord Clarendon; the documentary basis and scheme of it still stands in black-on-white, and can be read by all persons.  In this Document the reader will find, set forth in authentic business-form, a Scheme of Settlement somewhat different from that of ‘extermination,’ which, if he be curious in that matter, he ought to consult.  First, it appears by this Document, ‘all husbandmen, ploughmen, labourers, artificers and others of the meaner sort’ of the Irish nation are to be,—not exterminated; no, but rendered exempt from punishment and question, as to these Eight Years of blood and misery now ended [having begun with the Jesuit Order’s Irish Massacre totaling over 300,000 Protestant victims!—EJP]; which is a very considerable exception from the Clarendon Scheme!

“Next, as to the Ringleaders, the rebellious Landlords, and Papist Aristocracy; as to these also, there is a carefully-graduated scale of punishments established, that punishment and guilt may in some measure correspond.  All that can be proved to have been concerned in the Massacre of Forty-one [1641]; for these, and for certain other persons of the turncoat species, whose names are given, there shall be no pardon:—‘extermination,’ actual death on the gallows, or perpetual banishment and confiscation for these; but not without legal inquiry and due trial first had, for these, or for any one.  Then certain others, who have been in arms at certain dates against the Parliament, but not concerned in the Massacre:  these are declared to have forfeited their estates; but lands to the value of one-third of the same, as a modicum to live upon, shall be assigned them, where the Parliament thinks safest,—in the moorlands of Connaught, as it turned out.  Then another class, who are open Papists and have not manifested their good affection to the Parliament:  these are to forfeit one-third of their estates; and continue quiet at their peril.  Such is the Document; which was regularly acted on; fulfilled with as much exactness as the case, now in the hands of very exact men, admitted of.  The Catholic Aristocracy of Ireland have to undergo this fate, for their share in the late miseries [the Irish Massacre]; this and no other:  and as for all ‘ploughmen, husbandmen, artificers and people of the meaner sort,’ they are to live quiet where they are, and have no questions asked.

“In this way, not in the way of ‘extermination,’ was Ireland settled by the Puritans.  Five-and-forty thousand armed ‘kurisees’ [deported Irish mercenaries] are fighting, not without utility we hope, far off in foreign parts [for Roman Catholic monarchs].  Incurably turbulent ringleaders of revolt are sent to the moorlands of Connaught.  Men of the Massacre where they can be convicted, of which some instances occur, are hanged.  The mass of the Irish Nation lives quiet under a new Land Aristocracy; new, and in several particulars very much improved indeed:  under these lives now the mass of the Irish Nation; ploughing, delving, hammering; with their wages punctually paid them; with the truth spoken to them, and the truth done to them, so as they had never before seen it since they were a Nation! Clarendon himself admits that Ireland flourished, to an unexampled extent, under this arrangement.  One can very well believe it.  What is to hinder poor Ireland from flourishing, if you will do the truth to it and speak the truth, instead of doing the falsity and speaking the falsity?

“Ireland, under this arrangement, would have grown-up gradually into a sober diligent drabcoloured population; developing itself, most probably, in some form of Calvinistic Protestantism.  For there was hereby a Protestant Church of Ireland, of the most irrefragable nature, preaching daily in all its actions and procedure a real Gospel of veracity, of piety, of fair dealing and good order, to all men; and certain other ‘Protestant Churches of Ireland,’ and unblessed real-imaginary Entities, of which the human soul is getting weary [Roman Catholicism], would of a surety never have found footing there!  But the Ever-blessed Restoration came upon us [King Charles II Stuart returning from Jesuit-ruled France to England and taking the throne in 1660 then to make Presbyterian Scotland “howl” for 28 years].  All that arrangement was torn-up by the roots; and Ireland was appointed to develop itself as we have seen [into a fanatical Roman Catholic nation constantly conspiring against Protestant England via the Jesuits now ruling both Dublin and London].  Not in the drabcoloured Puritan way;—in what other way is still a terrible dubiety [doubt leading to vacillation and uncertain outcome], to itself and to us [Englishmen]!  It will be by some Gospel of Veracity, I think , when the Heavens are pleased to send such.  This ‘Curse of Cromwell,’ so-called, is the only Gospel of that kind I can yet discover to have ever been fairly afoot there.”

Thomas Carlyle, Oliver Cromwell’s Letters and Speeches: With Elucidations, (London: Chapman and Hall, Ltd. 1894), Vol. II of V, pp. 258-260.

Eric Jon Phelps
By Eric Jon Phelps October 19, 2010 17:17 Updated
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